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Chesswood Junior School

Chesswood Junior School

Black History Month

Black History Month

Black History Month is an annual observance originating in the United States where it is also known as African-American History Month. It has received official recognition from governments in the United States and Canada, and more recently has been observed in Ireland, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. It began as a way of remembering important people and events in the history of Africa and the African diaspora (A diaspora (/daɪˈæspərə/) is a scattered population whose origin lies in a separate geographic locale.). It is celebrated in February in the United States and Canada, while in Ireland, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom it is observed in October.

Black History Month 2020

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Black History Month Website

Please click on the image opposite to visit the Black History Month Website. The website includes a wide range of important, inspiring and enlightening reviews of events and people.

 

BHM Prime Minister Boris Johnson

For countless generations people of African and Caribbean descent have been shaping our nation’s story, making a huge difference to our national and cultural life and helping to make Britain a better place to be.

Please click the link opposite to watch a short message from the Prime Minister about Black History Month

 

Celebrating Black History - Locally, Nationally and Internationally

We want to hear from you - widen and enrich our school experience

This part of the Chesswood Junior School, Black History Month web page focuses on links to people an events that are important and appropriate to share with children aged between 7-11. The online form below invites children and parents within the school community to share individual person or group  of people - locally, nationally or internationally; using materials on-line or off line that would be appropriate for children aged 7-11 or within an individual year group e.g. Year 6 age 10-11, If you are wishing to complete the form from a smaller device such as a phone or tablet, please use this LINK

Black History Resources - Locally, Nationally and Internationally

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BBC Newsround - Black History Month: What is it?

October is Black History Month in the UK, an event that has been celebrated nationwide for more than 30 years.

The month was originally founded to recognise the contributions that people of African and Caribbean backgrounds have made to the UK over many generations.

Now, Black History Month has expanded to include the history of not just African and Caribbean people but black people in general.

 

BBC Newsround - Why is black British History so important?

The death of an African-American Geiorge Floyd has sparked lots of conversations about racsim and how it can be tackled.

Celebrities like George the Poet have highlighted the importance of education when it comes to stamping out the discrimination many black people around the world face because of the colour of their skin.

Campaign groups and charities like The Black Curriculum and Fill in the Blanks have also spoken out on the importance of black history being taught in schools.

These campaigners believe all children and young people need to learn about the important roles black people have played throughout British history and the many contributions they have made to society today.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/53109037

 

BBC Newsround - Kids Views

Black History Month is happening in October and it's when people celebrate the contribution that black people have made to the UK.

It started 30 years ago because, throughout history, black people have been discriminated against and treated badly because of the colour of their skin.

Kids have been telling Newsround why Black History Month is important to them.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/41453182

 

 

BBC Newsround Bristol

Our modern cities have been shaped by the money made from slavery and we wanted to find out how.

Black people are central to the story of our cities because their work helped fund our buildings, institutions, culture and history.

We met up with Esther Deans, who is a teacher in Bristol working to make the city's education more equal and diverse.

She took us on a tour of the city to show us how the history of slavery can still be found in its street names, organisations and monuments. Watch this.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/41453182

 

BBC Newsround: The Windrush

Windrush Day takes place on 22 June, remembering the day when around 500 migrants from the Caribbean arrived at Tilbury Docks in Essex in 1948.

Britain was just starting to recover from World War Two back then. Thousands of buildings had been bombed, lots of houses had been destroyed and it all needed to be rebuilt.

In the Caribbean, lots of young men and women had served in the British armed forces because at the time, many Caribbean countries were still under British rule and not yet independent.

After the war, some of these people answered an advert to come to Britain where there were lots of different jobs to do. 

Other people just wanted to see Britain, which they had heard so much about.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/43793769

 

Finding my family - Windrush: A newsround special

To mark the 70th anniversary of that first journey, Maya and Levi head back to the Caribbean islands that their granddads left to see where they grew up and why they decided to start new lives in the UK.

They each had three missions to complete while they were there.

You can find out what Maya and Levi learned by watching Finding My Family - Windrush: A Newsround Special.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/44503109

 

BBC Newsround: Black Lives Matter - what does it mean

You may have heard lots of people using the phrase 'Black Lives Matter' in recent times.

It's a statement which has become an important way for people to show their support for members of the black community who have experienced discrimination simply because of the colour of their skin.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/53149076

 

BBC Newsround: Systemic Racism - Kids questions answered

What is systemic racism, are the issues in the US and UK the same, and what can we do to make a difference?

We put children's questions on the Black Lives Matter movement to a politician, a historian and an academic.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/53345649

 

Colourism: Dark-skinned and light-skinned - why there is no difference

If you're black or Asian then you might be familiar with other black and Asian people making comments on how light-skinned or dark-skinned you are.

If you're not, you might have heard these comments being made at school or elsewhere.

What is colourism?

Colourism is a form of racism which is usually seen when people are negative about people who have a darker skin tone. It also includes people that treat others with a lighter-skin tone better.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/47872368

 

BBC Newsround: Stamp Out Racism

Footballer Gabriel Zakuani talks about his racism experience and what you can do if you come across nasty comments online💪

 

 

 

BBC Newsround: Racism in the UK - Special Programme

De'Graft presents a Newsround special programme all about racism in the UK.

In this bulletin, we'll be hearing from some of you and finding out what it's like growing up in Britain if you're black.

We'll also be looking at what could be done to help make the situation better in the future.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/53075349

 

BBC Newsround: Advice if you are upset about racism

You may have seen a lot in the news about racism recently.

Racism is where words or actions are used to discriminate against, or disadvantage, someone because of their colour, culture or ethnic origin.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/53068444

 

 

Important Individuals

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Black history: The forgotten history of black people in the UK

The BBC has launched two new online series - Alt History and Black to Life - that take a look back at black British history that has been forgotten.

Over the years, people have been campaigning to make history more inclusive.

That means that instead of always telling the stories of white British and white European historical figures, people from black and minority ethnic communities should be represented as well.

 

BBC Newsround: Great women you should know about...

Throughout history, black people have made huge contributions to society in the fields of art, music, science, literature and many more areas.

But in the past these contributions have often been ignored or played down because black people weren't treated the same way as other people because of the colour of their skin.

Black History Month aims to address this unfairness by celebrating these achievements and contributions.

Read on to find out about the incredible things that 12 women in particular have done for Britain.

BBC Newsround: The men who made history in Britain

Black History Month has been marked in the UK for more than 30 years. It takes place during the month of October.

It happens because so often in the past, the contributions made by black people to the community were ignored or played down because black people weren't treated the same way as other people because of the colour of their skin.

Black History Month aims to address this unfairness, by celebrating the achievements and contributions of the black community over the years.

Read on to find out about the incredible things that these 10 men have done for Britain.

Harriet Tubman:

A black slave who grew up in slavery. She fled to North America for freedom but once there she realised she had to help others gain freedom too. She risked her life on many occasions by leading slaves to freedom in the North. She was on the wanted list with a high bounty. Later in life she was a nurse to northern state soldiers (who were fighting to free slaves and end slavery) and spied on the enemy, feeding information back to the army. She was also a suffragette and fought for women's rights. 

 

Ruby Bridges

One of the first black American children to enter an all-white state school. She had to pass pickets and crowds every day who were against her being allowed to attend. Year 3 may particularly engage with Ruby as she started school at a similar age to them starting Chesswood so a lovely opportunity to model empathy and question how she would have felt.

3 Minute video of Ruby as an adult discussing her experiences. 

Jack Leslie:

Should have been the first black football player for England and is often recognised as the first black football player for England. Despite being selected for the team based on his talents, he was replaced last minute due to the colour of his skin. Despite this he had played for Barking Town and Plymouth Argyle and helped many black children see that they could also aspire to play football and succeed. Football has often struggled with equality within the sport and racism from fans and within the system remain an issue today. Without people like Jack Leslie being determined to pursue their dreams and talents other famous black British players may have not felt it possible to aim so high.

 news report exploring the aim to build a statue in his honour. This has since been rejected. Great discussion piece.

Martin Luther King:

Social activist who led the civil rights movement. Martin Luther King Jr believed in peaceful protest and helped bring better rights to black Americans which earned him the Nobel Peace prize. He was assassinated but his legacy would inspire other black people to demand equal rights and justice.